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Tipping Ashore
A Guide to Intelligent Tipping in Port Did you know that tipping can be insulting in Japan? Were you aware that many European hotels and restaurants add the tip to your bill? Tipping can be a puzzling experience for overseas travelers. It’s commonplace in some countries, in others it’s expected only in major cities, and in some it simply isn’t done. The rules are also in a constant state of change, so what was appropriate the last time you visited your favorite foreign destination may be completely inappropriate the next time you go. This Worldwide Tipping Guide is designed to advise travelers of common tipping practices in over 70 countries. Please remember, however, that it is only a guide – tipping is a reward for good service, and in the end the value is up to you. General Tipping Information: Asia and the Pacific: Special care must be taken to insure that your well-meaning gesture is not taken as insulting. If you are unsure, it is best not to tip. If possible, observe the locals and follow their lead. Europe: Many hotels and restaurants add a service charge to the bill. In most cases, an additional tip is unnecessary. If no service charge is added to your bill 10% is the general rule for restaurant service, a dollar per bag will be appreciated. Middle East/Africa: While your tip will not be seen as insulting, it may be unnecessary. Once again, the best bet is to do as the locals do. Central/South America: Many hotels and restaurants add a service charge to the bill, and an additional tip is unnecessary. If not, 10% is the general rule for restaurant service, and a dollar per bag will be appreciated. Courtesy of Magellan's ®